COVID-19 fears turning NYC playgrounds into war zones

October 27, 2020Posted on
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Lauren Conlin has seen her share of pandemic playground drama. Once, another mom yelled at her for briefly pulling her mask down so she could sip her iced coffee. “I…

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Adaption and Resilience while living through COVID-19

October 22, 2020Posted on
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Home has become many things in the age of COVID-19. It is the office, the gym, the salon, the closest restaurant — and for many parents, it is now the…

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Why Mental Health for Men Matters

October 19, 2020Posted on
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I often hear men describing a gap between what they are feeling and what they are expected to feel, and that makes it even worse. “Why am I complaining?” I often hear. “I was raised to be strong and to tough it out. If I was in a third world country, or a prisoner, I could understand that I might feel unhappy and angry. But I live a pretty good life, in a nice house with a beautiful family. This is all I ever wanted, so why am I not happy? Why do I feel that things are not right? Why the anger and irritability?”

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College Bound in 2020? Not So Fast.

September 4, 2020Posted on
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School is an essential and consistent part of a young adult’s life, and when that becomes restricted, their whole world is turned upside down. They are being taught to be afraid of getting COVID-19. They carry the burden that even if they go to college, they may be bringing COVID-19 back to their homes and getting their parents or grandparents sick. They are now responsible for keeping up with the curriculum and pioneering a novel educational structure. Not an easy feat.

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Ways To Mentally Cope With The Coronavirus

July 30, 2020Posted on
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Tips from Clinical Psychologist Dr. Judith Zackson you might find helpful while social distancing, quarantining, and self-isolating during the coronavirus.

“A pandemic or any other kind of trauma is a wake-up call that invites us to consider what is most important to us. Many of us are realizing how much we valued the opportunity to spend time with friends, family and colleagues in-person now that we are separated. We are struggling to find the same amount of meaning and fulfillment in our relationships that we did when we could connect with people face-to-face.”

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PTSD Treatment

The Impact of Traumatic Events

June 29, 2020Posted on
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PTSD is a disorder that is triggered by witnessing or experiencing a traumatic event. Historically, the psychological problems of soldiers returning from war (the American civil war, World War I, World War II, and the Korean war) were called “soldier’s heart,” “shell shock,” “combat fatigue,” or “Post Vietnam syndrome.” Those who served in combat would come home feeling distressed and anxious, suffering from flashbacks, nightmares, and a sense of detachment that interfered with their daily lives. In 1980, PTSD was officially recognized as a distinct diagnosis and added to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

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How do you know it’s time to see a therapist?

June 21, 2016Posted on
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According to Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), about 42.5 million American adults suffer from some form of mental illness. Only about 46-65 percent with moderate-to-severe impairment are in treatment. Are you one of them and how do you know it’s time to seek treatment? Despite the cultural belief, you do not have to be “mentally ill” or feel “extremely bad” to see a therapist. It’s time to see a therapist when you feel that something is not right, before you experience symptoms of a diagnosable mental illness.

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Triumphing Over Negative Body Image

June 20, 2016Posted on
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The countdown to summer has begun, and we are getting ready to enjoy the beautiful weather. However, peeling off layers and thinking about summer shorts and bathing can bring up negative self-talk to the point of bullying ourselves: looking into the mirror and saying, “My body is disgusting, my thighs are huge, I am a fat pig and cannot be seen in public.” The frequency of this harsh internal chatter can vary from once a day to constantly, and it can influence food intake, activity level, socialization/isolation, and even anxiety, depression, and eating disorders.

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